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  • A bill to level the playing field for tiny browsers is being discussed in the US Congress.
  • If passed, the bill will stop Big Tech firms from advertising their browsers on their goods.
  • 5 billion people use the default browsers on their phones and desktops every day.

The American Creativity and Choice Online Act (AICOA), a law that will equalize the playing field for niche browsers like Opera and DuckDuckGo versus digital behemoths with “default browsers” like Google, Microsoft, and Apple, is now being discussed in the US Congress.

Senators Amy Klobuchar and Chuck Grassley, as well as Members David Cicilline and Ken Buck, are leading the effort.

According to TechRadar, if the measure is passed, Big Tech corporations won’t be allowed to promote their browsers on their goods, which will decentralize 20 years of digital centralization and allow for smaller browsers to finally compete with the industry’s big players.

The five billion people who use the internet regularly utilize and remain with the default programs on their laptops and phones as of right now. Smaller browsers suffer because default browsers, like Safari on Apple iPhones, make it difficult for users to install and maintain other browsers.

According to Gabriel Weinberg, CEO of DuckDuckGo, changing the default search engine on Android now requires more than fifteen clicks. Weinberg believes that it should just take one click.

“We might be five or 10 times bigger today if this type of mechanism were in place,” he said.

The AICOA law is anticipated to take effect in the next years, giving lesser-known browsers like DuckDuckGo the opportunity to compete with industry heavyweights and, more crucially, realize their full potential.

Read More: The UE5-Powered Fan-Made Prototype Displays the Potential of a Fallout New Vegas Remake

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