Asia is leading in new computing technology
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Asia is leading in new computing technology

The race to develop new computing technologies is heating up, and Asia is leading the charge

When the University of Tokyo and IBM unveiled their new quantum computer last year, it was already gaining traction in Japan and elsewhere in Asia.

The computer was IBM’s second such system created outside of the United States, and it was the most recent in a series of significant quantum research developments.

The university and IBM have headed the Quantum Innovation Initiative Consortium, which includes Japanese industrial giants such as Toyota and Sony, to solve the quantum puzzle.

  • Japan has made significant advances in the quantum computing race, India has devised its strategy for the technology, and arguments rage over whether China has exceeded the United States in some areas.
  • Quantum computing will eventually increase the processing power that powers many businesses, and it will have an impact on everything from medicine development to data security.
  • While the technology has the potential to alter businesses such as medicine, it may also pose security risks.

Quantum computing is the application of quantum physics to solve problems. Quantum computing, unlike classical computing, can perform numerous processes at the same time because it uses quantum bits rather than binary bits.

Putting the United States ‘hegemony’ to the test: The new technology will eventually increase the processing power that powers numerous businesses, and it will have an impact on everything from medical development to data security. Several countries are vying to be the first to completely operationalize quantum computers.

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Christopher Savoie, the CEO of quantum computing startup Zapata, who spent much of his career in Japan, believes that technological advancement has been dominated by the United States. Asian countries, on the other hand, do not want to be left behind in quantum computing, he noted.

India, Japan, and China all want to avoid being the only ones who don’t know what they’re doing. They don’t want to see the kind of hegemony that has emerged. the big cloud aggregators are mostly US-based,” Savoie added, referring to Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure.

China, for example, has poured a lot of resources into the quantum race. Researchers have hailed advancements, and speculation is rife as to whether China has eclipsed the United States in some areas.

India, for its part, stated earlier this year that it will invest $1 billion over five years to construct a quantum computer.

According to James Sanders of S&P Global Market Intelligence, governments all around the world have been more interested in quantum computing in recent years.

Sanders released a study in March revealing that countries had contributed $4.2 billion to assist quantum research. South Korea’s $40 million investment in the sector and Singapore’s Ministry of Education’s sponsorship of a research institute, The Center for Quantum Technologies, are two significant examples.

What is it going to be used for?

All of these initiatives have a long-term perspective. Quantum’s advantages might sometimes appear hazy to others.

According to Sanders, the advantages of quantum computing will not be readily apparent to ordinary people.

Threats to security

Quantum, on the other hand, might pose a security risk. As computational power grows, the danger to conventional security approaches grows as well.

“The cryptography sector is the longer-term [motive] but the one that everyone understands as an existential danger, both offensively and defensively.” “RSA will be compromised as a result of this,” Savoie added.RSA stands for one of the most widely used encryption systems for safeguarding data, which was invented in 1977 and might be overturned by quantum speed. It’s called for the three people who created it: Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir, and Leonard Adleman.

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