PTI Files Case In Supreme Court After A Long March To Islamabad
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ISLAMABAD: The PTI petitioned the Supreme Court on Wednesday, requesting permission from the court before announcing another long march to Islamabad.

PTI Chairman Imran Khan has stated that the party would petition the Supreme Court for assurances that its workers and leaders will not be jailed and that the party will be permitted to organize rallies in the federal capital.

The PTI chairman made the declaration after suddenly ending the Azadi March on March 26 and giving the government for deciding a date for the election otherwise they will return with a flood of people.

Asad Umar: PTI Files Case In Supreme Court

Asad Umar

The leader of PTI stated these lines outside of the Supreme Court that the party had petitioned the court and requested nine questions.

The federal government, Islamabad IG Police, and all provinces and their police heads are mentioned as parties in the petition.

According to Asad Umar, the authorities initiated a crackdown on the party two days before the march. “Police used force and fired tear gas rounds at demonstrators.”

The caravans arriving in Islamabad from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa were barred from entering the federal capital.

“The chief ministers of KP and Gilgit-Baltistan were also restricted to enter the capital of Pakistan”.

According to Asad Umar, the [PML-N] practice of targeting institutions is not unlawful.

he said he will alert for all the threats to the government.

Hundreds of thousands of people came out despite the worst government brutality, Asad Umar alleged.

“The administration intends to divide the federation and the provinces,” he claims.

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The PTI requested the court in its plea to instruct authorities not to torture or detain Pakistanis., as well as supporters, workers, members, and leaders of the public who wish to peacefully organize any protest or assembly announced by it.

It asked the court to order the federal and provincial governments not to erect any barrier or obstacle, including limiting access to or from any location or city in any way or restricting people’s mobility in any way and by any means.

It further requested that the Supreme Court issue orders to the government prohibiting the use of violence, including force or strongarm tactics, against any citizen, supporter, worker, member, or leader of the party who wishes to join in the impending peaceful assembly.

PTI Petition Raises Several Issues

  • Is freedom of movement, as well as the right to peaceful protest and march, a basic right of all Pakistanis under the 1973 Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan.
  • Whether executive authorities can unjustly limit constitutional rights entrenched in Articles 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, and 25 of the Constitution by using excessive and unlawful force against peaceful citizens?
  • Whether the basic rights entrenched in Articles 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, and 25 of the Constitution must be maintained and protected against unlawful and illegal governmental curtailment?
  • Whether the State and governmental agencies of Pakistan can illegally deprive citizens of their liberty, as protected by Articles 9 and 10 of the Constitution, by arresting persons who are or want to join in a peaceful demonstration for the realization of their democratic rights?
  • Whether state agents can browbeat, intimidate, or physically damage people and organizations gathered for a peaceful march, infringing on their ‘inviolable’ dignity and privacy of home, as protected by Article 14 of the Constitution?
  • Whether Pakistani people have the right, under Article 15 of the Constitution, to enter, move about, and reside peacefully in various areas of Pakistan?
  • Whether citizens have the right, under the language and spirit of Article 16 of the Constitution, to peacefully congregate, protest, and organize demonstrations in order to fulfill their democratic demands?
  • Whether the petitioner, a validly registered political party, has the basic right, under Article 17 of the Constitution, to organize, associate, and conduct a countrywide political demonstration without intervention from federal and provincial government authorities?
  • Whether the arrest and custody of the petitioner’s political party members before or during a lawfully organized demonstration constitute illegal detention and arrest, as well as a breach of the petitioner’s rights under Article 17 of the Constitution?

Read More: IRON FIST WILL DEAL WITH ‘ANTI-STATE MARCH’: RANA SANAULLAH 

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