Climate expert on the horrific floods in Pakistan and the record drought in Europe
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Due to a combination of intense monsoon rainfall and glacier melting, Pakistan is currently experiencing disastrous extreme floods. Even while Pakistan has seen fatal floods before, this incident is particularly alarming because it has already claimed more than 1,100 lives and affected millions more.

One-third of Pakistan, a slightly wider than the province of Victoria, is reportedly submerged, according to the country’s climate head.

This summer in the Northern Hemisphere has seen a string of catastrophic weather occurrences, from flooding in both Japan and South Korea to record-breaking droughts in Western Europe, the Americas, and China.

This raises the issue of how much the climate is to blame. If so, should we anticipate this going forward?

The most recent in a string of extraordinary calamities in the Northern Hemisphere is the floods in Pakistan.

Other Countries About Floods in Pakistan

Water restrictions have been imposed as a result of heatwaves and droughts that broke records in Western Europe, Central and Eastern China, and those regions. Due to agricultural shortages brought on by these heatwaves and droughts, the price of food is rising globally.

China experienced a problem in its energy security. The longest river in Italy is also running at a tenth of its normal velocity. It is anticipated that these droughts, along with their substantial effects, will last for some time.

From Dallas, Texas, in the United States, to Seoul, South Korea, which received its most heavy rain in a century, severe downpours have resulted in flooding.

Japan, the central US, and the UK have also seen record-breaking heat extremes, with the UK seeing the first occasion that temperatures above 40°C.

Additionally, it has only been a couple months since northern Pakistan and India had 50°C temperatures before to the monsoon season.

While it’s true that some of this summer’s severe events have been remarkable, the summer in the Northern Hemisphere typically sees the greatest number of high-impact extreme weather events. This is because the hottest part of the year is more likely to experience excessive heat, intense rain, and drought.

The Northern Hemisphere is home to more over 85% of the world’s inhabitants and two thirds of the planet’s territory. This makes the Northern Hemisphere summertime the most likely season for catastrophes to have devastating effects since more people will be impacted by extreme weather there than in the Southern Hemisphere.

Additionally, due of “Rossby waves,” which are large-scale atmospheric waves that are a found naturally phenomena, similar to La Nia and El Nio, extreme weather events can take place simultaneously across several locations.

Climate expert on the horrific floods in Pakistan and the record drought in Europe

In 2010, Pakistan suffered some of its worst floods to date, while western Russia endured extreme temperatures and wildfires. A Rossby wave related these occurrences by causing low pressure to linger over Pakistan and a high pressure trend to become locked over western Russia.

Rossby waves may also cause heatwaves hundreds of kilometres distant to develop at the same time. Earlier in this summer in the Northern Hemisphere, heatwaves simultaneously hit the western US, western Europe, and China.

It’s too early to say for sure, but Rossby waves may have led to simultaneous calamities this summer.

It’s important to evaluate if climate change is a factor in the numerous extreme weather occurrences that result in large-scale human casualties as well as economic and environmental consequences.

To present, global warming brought about by human activity has warmed the earth by around 1.2°C, increasing the frequency and intensity of some extreme weather events, including extreme heatwaves and record-breaking temperatures.

Every heatwave in today’s climate may be traced back to the greenhouse gas emissions that are causing climate change. Rapid analysis have already shown that the chance of the excessive heat in Pakistan and India in May and the record-breaking UK temperatures in July was significantly boosted by human influence on the climate.

According to research, the Northern Hemisphere is seeing more simultaneous heatwaves, mostly as a result of long-term warming.

The frequency of the Rossby wave pattern, which creates simultaneous heatwaves in many locations, is less certain.

As a result of altered rainfall patterns brought on by climate change, several regions, including much of Western Europe, are experiencing a deepening drought.

Additionally, climate change is causing more frequent and intense severe rain showers and extreme quick heavy rain, as what was recently seen in Dallas and Seoul. This is due to the fact that air holds more moisture as a result of global warming; the atmosphere can contain 7% extra moisture for every 1°C of heat.

In fact, Pakistan has seen tremendous rains in line with a documented pattern of rising extreme daily average rainfall. As the earth warms, it is predicted that this region of the world will continue to have daily and multi-day intense rain events.

As worldwide emissions of greenhouse gases continue to rise at almost unprecedented rates, we should anticipate increasingly severe weather conditions in the upcoming years.

For decades, scientists have warned that extreme weather conditions, notably heatwaves, will get worse. We are currently witnessing this unfold in front of us.

After slightly over 1°C of global warming, several recent heat extremes have gone much beyond what we anticipated, such as the record-breaking summer heat in western North America. But it’s difficult to discern if our predictions are overestimating the intensity of the heat.

In any event, the globe has to get ready for other potential record-breaking extreme temps in the upcoming months, years, and decades. In order to reduce the harm caused by upcoming severe occurrences, we must quickly decarbonize.

Read More: Rehabilitation of flood victims: KP CM forbids any interaction with the Center

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